.NET Core 3.0 will reach End of Life on March 3, 2020

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.NET Core 3.0 will reach end of life on March 3, 2020. It is a “Current” release and is superseded by .NET Core 3.1, which was released on December 3, 2019. After that time, .NET Core patch updates will no longer include updated packages .NET Core 3.0. .NET Core 3.1 is a long-term supported (LTS) release (supported for at least 3 years). We recommend that you move any .NET Core 3.0 applications and environments to .NET Core 3.1 now. It’ll be an easy upgrade in most cases.

Upgrade to .NET Core 3.1

  • Open the project file (the *.csproj, *.vbproj, or *.fsproj file).
  • Change the target framework value from netcoreapp3.0 to netcoreapp3.1. The target framework is defined by the <TargetFramework> or <TargetFrameworks> element.
  • For example, change <TargetFramework>netcoreapp3.0</TargetFramework> to <TargetFramework>netcoreapp3.1</TargetFramework>.

Microsoft Support Policy

Microsoft has a published support policy for .NET Core. It includes policies for two release types: LTS and Current.

  • LTS releases include features and components that have been stabilized, requiring few updates over a longer support release lifetime. These releases are a good choice for hosting applications that you do not intend to update often.
  • Current releases include features and components that are new and may undergo future change based on feedback. These releases are a good choice for applications in active development, giving you access to the latest features and improvements. You need to upgrade to later .NET Core releases more often to stay in support.

Both types of releases receive critical fixes throughout their lifecycle, for security, reliability, or to add support for new operating system versions. You must stay up-to-date with the latest patches to qualify for support.

See .NET Core Supported OS Lifecycle Policy to learn about Windows, macOS and Linux versions that are supported for each .NET Core release.

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